Current distribution status of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) in Northwestern Baja California, Mexico

Current distribution status of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) in Northwestern Baja California, Mexico

The current distribution status, abundance and nesting of the Golden Eagle in Northwestern Baja California, Mexico, based on samplings during 2 years (January 2013–December 2014) throughout a series of scanned transects of 100 km that resulted in a total of 1,634 km in length is documented. The aver...

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Journal Title: Revista mexicana de biodiversidad
First author: Gonzalo de León-Girón
Other Authors: Ricardo Rodríguez-Estrella;
Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos
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Language: English
Get full text: http://www.revista.ib.unam.mx/index.php/bio/article/view/1545
Resource type: Journal Article
Source: Revista mexicana de biodiversidad; Vol 87, No 4 (Year 2016).
Publisher: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Usage rights: Reconocimiento - NoComercial - SinObraDerivada (by-nc-nd)
Categories: Life Sciences --> Biodiversity Conservation
Abstract: The current distribution status, abundance and nesting of the Golden Eagle in Northwestern Baja California, Mexico, based on samplings during 2 years (January 2013–December 2014) throughout a series of scanned transects of 100 km that resulted in a total of 1,634 km in length is documented. The average number of individuals detected/100 km was statistically similar between 2013 and 2014, with an average value of 1.5 ± 0.6 during both years. Number of eaglets per nest showed to be statistically independent (p > 0.05) from the abundance of potential prey, altitude, types of vegetation and lineal distance to urban zones. One hundred and one individuals of the Golden Eagle that have been historical (1843–1995) or recently recorded (2000–2014) for 11 localities of Baja California (3 historical and 9 recent) were reported. Five priority areas were identified for habitat conservation of this species in Baja California (Tecate, Valle de Guadalupe, Sierra de Juárez, Valle de Santo Domingo, and Sierra de San Pedro Mártir). Chronologically, the population of the Golden Eagle in Baja California has maintained active its distribution and nesting areas at least during the last 2 decades.